I’m not Dead

However I’ve been really busy working with Google’s project Tango. I encourage you to watch the video if you haven’t already.

What is NASA doing with project Tango? Well currently there is a very vague article available here. However the plan is to apply Tango to the SPHERES project to perform visual navigation. Lately, I’ve been overwhelmed with trying to meet the schedule of 0-g testing and all the hoops there are with getting hardware and software onboard the ISS. This has left very little time to write, let alone sleep. In a few weeks NASA export control will have gone over our collected data and I’ll be able to share here.

In the short term, project Tango represent an amazing opportunity to perform local mapping. The current hardware has little application to the large-scale satellite mapping that I usually discuss. However I think the ideas present in project Tango will have application in low-cost UAV mapping. Something David Shean of U of W has been pursuing. In the more immediate term I think the Tango hardware would have application to scientists wanting to perform local surveys of a glacial wall, cave, or anything you can walk all over. It’s ability to export its observations as a 3D model makes it perfect for sharing with others and perform long-term temporal studies. Yes the 3D sensor won’t work outside, however stereo observations and post processing with things like Photoscan are still possible with the daylight imagery. Tango will then be reduced to providing an amazing 6-DOF measurement of where each picture was taken. If this sounds interesting to you, I encourage you to apply for a prototype device! I’d be interested in helping you tackle a scientific objective with project Tango.

This picture is of Mark and I dealing with our preflight jitters of being onboard the “Vomit Comet” while 0-g testing the space-rated version of Project Tango. This shares my current state of mind. Also, there aren’t enough pictures of my ugly mug on this blog. I’m the guy on the right.

Mimicking Zero Gravity

I know I promised a different blog post than this one. However I’m a bit crammed for time lately. However I do have something quick to show …

This summer, my interns Abe Shultz and Benjamin Reinhardt rejuvenated an old gantry system that is used for mimicking zero gravity for small spacecraft. This is part of my work with the NASA SPHERES program. In this video I demonstrate the gantry responding to external forces applied on a wooden analog for SPHERE. In the future the real SPHERE will be loaded up and will use CO2 thrusters to move itself about the room with the gantry responding accordingly.

This test apparatus is one facility I plan to use to test out a new visual navigation system that my coworkers and I are developing. What I’m looking forward to is the vomit comet flight we have scheduled towards the end of the year. This is why I’ve left some of the software development of ASP with others.